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Independent News, Research, Scientific Analysis, and Commentary on the Smolensk Crash and its Implications. Flag of the United States of America
"The dismantling of the Polish State has just ended. Now people will start to disappear." Dr. Janusz Kurtyka Contact | About
  • Smolensk Crash DisinformationNo one saw anything, no one heard anything, no one filmed anything ...
  • Russian Image Management by Euguene PoteatRetired CIA Senior Scientific Intelligence Officer Euguene Poteat speaks out
  • TNT and other explosives detected on the wreckage of Polish presidential planeC4, TNT, RDX, HMX (octogen), p-MNT and Nitroglycerine detected ...
  • Smolensk Crash related deaths"The Serial Suicider" Strikes Again. Key witness dead!
  • Countdown to the crash of Flight PLF101Countdown to the crash of Polish Governement Tupolev TU-154M flight PLF101.
  • Smolensk Widow Beata Gosiewska exposes the Smolnesk Crash LieSmolensk Crash Widow exposes the "Smolensk Lie"
  • The List of 96 Victims of Polish Air Crash In Smolensk, Russia, on April 10, 2010.The list of 96 victims
  • 9 Questions for Professor Binienda.Is the U.S. scientific community interested in the Smolensk crash?
  • The destruction of the plane was initiated while it was still airborne, approaching landing.The destruction of the plane was initiated while it was still airborne, approaching landing.
  • Lech Kaczynski's Security Was Purposefully CompromisedPolish president's security was purposefully compromised!
  • Slide 11 Title Goes HereThe main causes of the Polish Tu-154M crash were two explosions onboard.
  • Facts presented in this report demonstrate a clear and convincing evidence of obstruction of justice in the one-sided and superficial investigation that violates basic norms of any airplane crash investigation, elementary standards of due process of law, and rights of the families of the victims.Was the official investigation an obstruction of justice?
Polish air crash disinformation. Russian Image Management by Retired CIA Senior Scientific Intelligene Officer, Eugene Poteat, LL.D Traces of explosives detected on remains of Polish president's plane. Serial Suicider on the loose. The crash of Flight PLF101 Timeline. Polish air crash lie exposed. Victims of Polish air crash. 9 Questions for the lead scientist in the independent Smolensk crash investigation. Mechanical and structural aspects of 2010 crash of Polish Government Tupolev TU-154M in Smolensk, Russka. Polish president's security was intentionally compromised. Scientific analysis of Smolensk crash points to the invalidity of the official findings. 2014 independent Smolensk Crash Raport: What do we know about Smolensk crash today.

Smolensk Crash Investigation Expert Profiles
Dr. Gregory Szuladzinski, Ph.D., MSME
SCIEPWB

Dr. Gregory Szuladzinski, Ph.D.
Dr. Gregory Szuladzinski, Ph.D.

Dr. Gregory Szuladzinski, Ph.D., MSME

Dr. Szuladzinski received his Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Warsaw University of Technology in 1965 and Doctoral Degree in Structural Mechanics from University of Southern California in 1973.

1966 to 1980: He worked in the United States mostly in the fields of aerospace and nuclear industries. The major employers were Northrop Corp. (structural design/analysis of Boeing 747 fuselage) Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena (Viking spaceship) Parker Hannifin (helicopter control mechanisms) and Aerojet General (nuclear plant structures and postulated accidents). There were a number of small projects taken up on consulting basis and relating to aerospace structures. He has done extensive work in computer simulation of seismic events and other dynamic conditions, as related to nuclear plant safety as well as military hardware.

1981 until present he has been working in Australia in the fields of aerospace, railway, power, offshore, and process industries. In aerospace the projects included an extensive analysis of A10 wing and landing gear, Mirage bomb rack structure including simulation of successive bomb ejection and response of Karinga bomb due to tail retarder. Also, automotive collisions were a subject of his computer simulations.

He has a number of publications to his credit in stress analysis, vibrations and nonlinear dynamics. His first book entitled Dynamics of Structures and Machinery, Problems and Solutions was published by John Wiley Interscience in 1982.

He has been involved with Finite Element Method of simulation of structural problems since 1966. In 1978-79 he worked as Principal Analyst for Control Data in Los Angeles in support of FEA codes, helping clients to formulate their analytical approach. He was instrumental in the effort to bring ANSYS code into Australia.

Since 1991 he has been doing research and computer simulations in the action of explosives, first in the area of rock breaking, then in the action of explosives on buildings and metallic structures. The analysis of violent phenomena included shock damage to buildings, structural collapse, fluid-structure interaction, blast protection and aircraft impact protection. He has done a number of state-of-the-art studies showing explicit fragmentation of structures and other objects.

His experience in transient nonlinear dynamics is summarized in his second book, Structural and Mechanical Shock and Impact Formulas (CRC Press, Oct.2009.) This has become an essential reference for many engineers who do related work.

In 2012 he began doing analysis of the Smolensk air crash of 2010 involving Tu-154M aircraft, studying various aspects of structural fragmentation caused by explosions and ground impact. Much of the related simulation work is available for public viewing.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers Australia, member of its Structural and Mechanical College, a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers.


Visit Analytical Service Co. Website for more information.

 

Books:

"Dynamics of Structures and Machinery - Problems and Solutions"

"Formulas for Mechanical and Structural Shock and Impact"

 

Engineering Research Papers & Scholarly Articles:

SHOCK & EXPLOSION RELATED PUBLICATIONS by Gregory Szuladzinski (after 1990)

 

1. Response of rock medium to explosive borehole pressure. (PAP1)

Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Rock Fragmentation by Blasting. (Fragblast-4). Vienna, July 1993

2. Fragmentation of a beam under lateral impulsive load. (PAP2)

Conference on dynamic loading in manufacturing and service. Institution of Engineers Australia, Melbourne, February 1993.

3. Splitting of rock medium with an explosive charge. (PAP3)

Proceedings of the Second Asian-Pacific Conference on computational mechanics. Sydney, August 1993.

4. Analysis of cylindrical boulder breaking with application to bench blasting. (PAP4)

Acta Mechanica, Vol.115, p.79, Springer - Verlag, Vienna 1996.

5. Analysis and interpretation of boulder blasting test results. (PAP5)

The Journal of the Explosives Engineering, Vol.13, No.8, Sept/Oct 1996. (Under the title “Rock Breaking - a Frontal Approach”.)

6. Mechanism of smooth blasting and its modeling. (PAP6)

Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Rock Fragmentation by Blasting. (Fragblast-5). Montreal, August 1996.

7. Body waves, surface waves and the scaling problem. Finite-element study. (PAP8)

Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Rock Fragmentation by Blasting. (Fragblast-6). Johannesburg, August 1999.

8. Current limits of ground motion during blasting. How reasonable and effective are they? (PAP11)

Bulletin (Journal of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy), May1998.

9. An imprint of explosive power: Plate denting experiments and their computer simulation. (PAP16)

The Journal of Explosives Engineering, Vol.16, No.1, Jan/Feb 1999.

10. Computer simulation of propelling of solid pieces by explosive action. (PAP15)

Proceedings of the 3d Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Singapore, Nov.1999.

11. Dynamic response of a multi-story building to a shock damage of a base column (PAP19)

Proceedings of the 3d Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Singapore, Nov.1999.

12. Multiple fragmentation of a ring under explosive pressure. (PAP10)

Parari ’99 - 4th Australian Explosive Ordnance Symposium, Canberra, Nov. 1999

13. Stress and strain magnification effect in rapidly loaded structural joints. (PAP18)

The 7th International Symposium on Structural Failure and Plasticity (Implast 2000) Melbourne, Australia, October 2000

14. Parameters of impact of a heavy mass falling onto a concrete surface. (PAP21)

Proceedings of the 4th Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Singapore, Nov. 2001

15. Disintegration of cylindrical shells under explosive pressure. (PAP22)

Parari 2001 - 5th Australian Explosive Ordnance Symposium, Canberra, Nov. 2001

16. Plasticity of steel under explosive loading and the effect on cylindrical shell fragmentation. (PAP26)

Proceedings, APEA2002 (The Sixth Asia-Pacific Symposium on Engr Plasticity.), Dec. 2002

17. Collapse of a concrete building to a ground-level explosion. (PAP27)

Parari 2003 - 6th Australian Explosive Ordnance Symposium, Canberra, Oct. 2003

18. Mechanism and sequence of core collapse of the North Tower of WTC. (PAP30)

First Int’l Conf. On Design and Analysis of Protective Structures. Tokyo, Dec. 2003.

20. Collision method for airblast waves interaction with movable solid bodies. (PAP23)

Proceedings of the 6th Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Perth, Australia, Dec. 2005

21. Response of Beams to Shock Loading: Inelastic Range. (PAP35)

Journal of Engineering Mechanics, ASCE, Vol.133, No.3, March 2007.

22. Mechanical Output of Contact Explosive Charges. (PAP31)

Proc. of the 2007 RNSA Security Technology Conf., Melbourne, Australia, 2007

23. Response of Inelastic Plates to Blast Loading. (PAP37)

Second Int’l Conf. On Design and Analysis of Protective Structures , Singapore, Nov. 2006.

24. Mass-plate impact parameters for the elastic range. (PAP44)

Acta Mechanica, Vol.200, No. 1-2, pp.111-125, 2008.

25. Discussion of “Mechanics of Progressive Colllapse: Learning from World Trade Center and Building Demolitions” by Z.P. Bazant and M. Verdure. (PAP45)

Journal of Engineering Mechanics, ASCE, Vol.134, No.10, Oct.2008, pp.913-915.

26. Transient Response of Circular, Elastic Plates to Point Loads (PAP42)

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam. ASME, Vol. 4, Issue 3, July 2009

27. Tall Buildings And Structural Collapse (PAP48)

Structure, New York, October 2009.

28. Strain-rate effects and some limits of their use. (PAP49)

Proceedings of the 8th Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Adelaide, Australia, Dec. 2009

29. Temporal Considerations in Collapse of WTC Towers (PAP50)

Int. J. Structural Engineering, Vol. 3, No. 3, Feb 2012, pp.189-207

30. Does stronger concrete mean stronger and more resilient elements? (PAP51)

International Journal of Protective Structures – Volume 3 · Number 3 · 2012, pp.293-309

31. Terminal strength and energy capacity of RC beams during progressive collapse of multistory buildings (PAP52)

Int. J. of Protective Structures, Vol.3, No.1, March 2012, pp. 37-60.

32. Response of Inelastic Plates to Blast Loading. (PAP37)

Second Int’l Conf. On Design and Analysis of Protective Structures , Singapore, Nov. 2006.

33. Mass-plate impact parameters for the elastic range. (PAP44)

Acta Mechanica, Vol.200, No. 1-2, pp.111-125, 2008.

34. Discussion of “Mechanics of Progressive Colllapse: Learning from World Trade Center and Building Demolitions” by Z.P. Bazant and M. Verdure. (PAP45)

Journal of Engineering Mechanics, ASCE, Vol.134, No.10, Oct.2008, pp.913-915.

35. Transient Response of Circular, Elastic Plates to Point Loads (PAP42)

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam. ASME, Vol. 4, Issue 3, July 2009

36. Tall Buildings And Structural Collapse (PAP48)

Structure, New York, October 2009.

37. Strain-rate effects and some limits of their use. (PAP49)

Proceedings of the 8th Asia-Pacific Conference on shock and impact loads on structures. Adelaide, Australia, Dec. 2009

38. Temporal Considerations in Collapse of WTC Towers (PAP50)

Int. J. Structural Engineering, Vol. 3, No. 3, Feb 2012, pp.189-207

39. Does stronger concrete mean stronger and more resilient elements? (PAP51)

International Journal of Protective Structures – Volume 3 · Number 3 · 2012, pp.293-309

40. Terminal strength and energy capacity of RC beams during progressive collapse of multistory buildings (PAP52)

Int. J. of Protective Structures, Vol.3, No.1, March 2012, pp. 37-60.

41. Some Misunderstandings Related To WTC Collapse Analysis (PAP57)

International Journal of Protective Structures – Vol. 4, No. 2, 2013, pp.117-125.

42. Transient beam response due to point load impact and determination of onset of yielding in bending. (PAP38)

Journal of Engineering Mechanics ASCE, Vol. 140, No. 1, Jan 1, 2014, ISSN 0733-9399/2014/1-0001–0004 (Technical Note)

Dr. Szuladzinski's projects can be found here.

 
"Russian Image Management"

The trip to Smolensk was expected to highlight Russia finally admitting culpability in the massacre, after long having blamed it on the Germans, an atrocity they had tried to conceal for over 70 years.

Eugene Poteat, retired CIA Senior Scientific Intelligence Officer.

As for the reception committee, it had different ideas. Putin wasn’t looking forward to such an occasion. Into this poisonous reception brew was President Kaczynski’s well-known public criticism of Moscow and Putin, a habit that has ended the lives of others within Russia – and abroad. A few discouraging Russian requirements – that Kaczynski could not attend in any official capacity – did not halt the Poles. Kaczynski would go anyway on non-official, “personal” business. To Russians, such a distinction would be meaningless, not lessening the possible international excoriation of such an event. A problem ripe for a modern, Russian solution: a tragic, ‘natural’ accident.

Read more here

 

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